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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

WALL OF WORDS

The Wall of Words provides a publication showcase for students studying in the suite of English creative writing courses. Writers of fiction, memoir, creative nonfiction, and poetry select poems

and prose excerpts that represent their voices to the broader campus audience.

The CURCA event gives faculty an opportunity to work with students on

selecting, editing, and presenting their very best, and in the process

create a twice-yearly anthology of student creative writing. 

PROJECT MANAGER
Grace Templeton '22 
English Major

FACULTY SPONSORS:
Professor Michael Filas 
Professor Leah Nielsen
Professor Becky Olander

Professor Sean Bates
Professor David Champoux (Holyoke Community College)

STUDENT PRESENTERS

Organized By Discipline

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Kaitlyn Egan '24
MAJOR: ENGLISH & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH  AND PROFESSOR JAMES SCHLAFFER, ECONOMICS

The Impact of Drug Use on Criminal Activity and its Depiction in HBO's The Wire 

My research focuses on the impact that drug use has on criminal behavior, and how it is depicted in HBP's The Wire. In order to shed light on this relationship I considered Bureau of Justice Statistics, Massachusetts Parole Hearings, and the character Bubbles in The Wire.

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Kayla Rodrigues '24
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Truth Behind Thanksgiving 

Everything that we have learned about Thanksgiving isn't as accurate as what actually went down. It's important to acknowledge the full story that occurred between Natives and Pilgrims.

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Jordan Aguiar '24
MAJOR: COMMUNICATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH

The Brutality of Policing n Television: Comparing Police Brutality Across Different Media

The goal of this research is to examine the ways in which the social climate has impacted the depiction of policing in television. The research will compare the ways that the network show, Chicago PD and a cable show, The Wire portray the policing and the problems within the system.

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Jennifer Diamond '23
MAJOR: MATHEMATICS

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH AND PROFESSOR JAMES SCHLAFFER, ECONOMICS

The Impact  from 9/11 on the War on Drugs in Worcester, MA 

In the show, The wire, we see within the first episode that the war on terror took precedent over, and took resources from, the war on drugs in Baltimore after 9/11. For my research, I am analyzing how my hometown, Worcester, MA, had a shift in police focus from drugs to terrorism in the early 2000s.

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Kerry Greenough '24
MAJOR: NURSING

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH  AND PROFESSOR JAMES SCHLAFFER, ECONOMICS

Community resources for Baltimore's Youth in Comparison to the Henry Street Settlement in New York City 

After viewing the first 3 seasons of "The Wire", children of Baltimore in the show were oftentimes seen in extremely dangerous settings and without parental supervision. For this reason, this research is focused on the community resources offered to Baltimore's youth in real life, and then compared those resources to The Henry Street Settlement, a highly praised community resource for New York's City's youth.

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Ziyah Johnston '23
MAJOR: ENGLISH LITERATURE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Stolen Lives of  Native American Women Due to Human Trafficking

Tommy Orange (who is from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma) authored a novel called There There. In the book, there are intriguing and sad conversations around violence towards Native American women, partly due to human trafficking. This project will look at why Native women are targeted by human traffickers, and what we can do as a society to protect them and raise awareness on the issue.

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Zachary Tyler '23
MAJOR: FINANCE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The History and Signifcance of Powwows

In the novel There There by Cheyanne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange he revolves his story around a powwow in Oakland where many different types of characters are linked to one celebration. This presentation will summarize the history of the Native American powwow and how it became and remains important to indigenous people.

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Julia Robak '26
MAJOR: ENGLISH 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

In the play, A Moon and Two Windows (2019), Kiowa author, N. Scott Momaday frames the play with The Carlisle Indian Industrial School football team playing West Point in an important game. This project will dig deeper into the history of Carlisle football led by Jim Thorpe, the coaches and players that shaped the successful program, and their impact on modern-day football.

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Timothy Pawloski '24
MAJOR: ENGLISH 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Exploring the Indian Relocation Act

In the novel, There There by Cheyanne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange brings up the Indian Relocation Act, an act that encouraged Native Americans to leave reservations and move to the cities to assimilate into the general public. This project will explore the details of what exactly the Indian Relocation act was while highlighting the struggles and accomplishments the Native American people experienced while assimilating to the cities.

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KiKi McNary'26
MAJOR: ENGLISH 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The history of Carlisle football and its

Modern-day Legacy.

The history of Carlisle football and its

Modern-day Legacy.

In the play, A Moon and Two Windows (2019), Kiowa author, N. Scott Momaday frames the play with The Carlisle Indian Industrial School football team playing West Point in an important game. This project will dig deeper into the history of Carlisle football led by Jim Thorpe, the coaches and players that shaped the successful program, and their impact on modern-day football.

Eli Pease '26
MAJOR: ENGLISH 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Many Meanings of Vé’ho’e

In the Novel There There, Cheyenne/Arapaho author Tommy Orange makes reference to creatures of Cheyenne legend known as Vé’ho’e, which can be translated to Whiteman or spider. This project will explore the different meanings of the word Vé’ho’e, the legends of the Vé’ho’e, and how the definition evolved over time due to colonization.

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Cole Rodrigues ‘26
MAJOR: EXPLORATORY

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA  DIANA, ENGLISH

The Pequot Massacre, the first Thanksgiving?  

Tommy Orange of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma mentions in his novel There There, the truth behind Thanksgiving, which originates from the Pequot massacre. This presentation will look into the Pequot Massacre to find the truth of what really happened on the first Thanksgiving.

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Ashley Ugolini ‘22
MAJOR: LIBERAL STUDIES

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 

In the novel There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange utilizes the character Geraldine to raise awareness on the disproportionately high rates of violence that Indigenous women face. This project will detail what violence Orange is referencing, explore why this epidemic is still occurring today, and research what activists are proposing as solutions to this issue.  

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Duncan Nichols-Delay ‘26
MAJOR: EXERCISE SCIENCE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Suffocation of The Spirit: Native American Boarding Schools

In the screenplay, The Moon In Two Windows, by Kiowa author, N. Scott Momaday, he talks about the truth behind Native American life within the American Indian Boarding Schools, which were intended to assimilate the students and make them colonized. Our project will talk about the pain and suffering these Native Americans had to endure while being students at these schools and the everlasting effect it had on their culture. 

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Chris Ross
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Suffocation of The Spirit: Native American Boarding Schools

In the screenplay, The Moon In Two Windows, by Kiowa author, N. Scott Momaday, he talks about the truth behind Native American life within the American Indian Boarding Schools, which were intended to assimilate the students and make them colonized. Our project will talk about the pain and suffering these Native Americans had to endure while being students at these schools and the everlasting effect it had on their culture. 

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Chase Russo
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH 

Suffocation of The Spirit: Native American Boarding Schools

In the screenplay, The Moon In Two Windows, by Kiowa author, N. Scott Momaday, he talks about the truth behind Native American life within the American Indian Boarding Schools, which were intended to assimilate the students and make them colonized. Our project will talk about the pain and suffering these Native Americans had to endure while being students at these schools and the everlasting effect it had on their culture. 

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James Hickey ‘24
MAJOR: BIOLOGY

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

An Exploration of Mental Health in Indigenous People 

In the novel There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange writes characters in a way that conveys the multitude of mental health issues Native people experience daily, including but not limited to depression, PTSD, OCD, anger issues, and alcoholism, mirroring the real-life mental health crisis that Native people face today. This project will research the complex interaction between Native culture, history, communal suppression, trauma, and mental health, while also exploring the effects this is having on Native people here and now. 

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Preston Young ‘24
MAJOR: HEALTH SCIENCE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Violent crime and Native American women 

In the novel There There, by Cheyenne and Arapaho member Tommy Orange, the fact that Native American women are disproportionately victimized by violent crime compared to other ethnicities is explored. This project’s intent is to discuss the rationale behind why these cases are so prevalent, and how the criminal justice system can be held largely accountable to how few cases are prosecuted.  

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Noah Harriman ’25
MAJOR: COMMUNICATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Violent crime and Native American women 

In the novel There There, by Cheyenne and Arapaho member Tommy Orange, the fact that Native American women are disproportionately victimized by violent crime compared to other ethnicities is explored. This project’s intent is to discuss the rationale behind why these cases are so prevalent, and how the criminal justice system can be held largely accountable to how few cases are prosecuted.  

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Zoe Pouliot ‘24
MAJOR: ENGLISH EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native Spirits 

The topic of spirits/ghosts came up multiple times, in “The Moon in Two Windows” by Kiowa author N. Scott Momaday, and “First Fruits” by Standing Rock Sioux author Susan Power, ghost characters are featured in both. This project will explore the beliefs in spirits in both the Kiowa and Sioux tribes and their impact on their culture.  

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Chris Greene ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Influence on Sports 

In the play, A Moon In Two Windows written by Kiowa author N. Scott Momaday, he talks about the Carlisle Indian School where Native American children were sent to be stripped of their heritage and formed to fit in the mold of a “proper American.” This project will look into the influential and under-appreciated role football played in the lives of the children at the school, and the way Carlisle football shaped the game of football today.   

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 Ryan Donahue ‘24
MAJOR: ECONOMICS
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Influence on Sports 

In the play, A Moon In Two Windows written by Kiowa author N. Scott Momaday, he talks about the Carlisle Indian School where Native American children were sent to be stripped of their heritage and formed to fit in the mold of a “proper American.” This project will look into the influential and under-appreciated role football played in the lives of the children at the school, and the way Carlisle football shaped the game of football today.   

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Ryan O'Halloran ‘26
MAJOR: BUSINESS MARKETING
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH 

Native American Influence on Sports 

In the play, A Moon In Two Windows written by Kiowa author N. Scott Momaday, he talks about the Carlisle Indian School where Native American children were sent to be stripped of their heritage and formed to fit in the mold of a “proper American.” This project will look into the influential and under-appreciated role football played in the lives of the children at the school, and the way Carlisle football shaped the game of football today.   

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Jordan Fournier ‘24
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Uncensored History of Thanksgiving 

In the novel There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange gave a violent description of the history behind Thanksgiving. This project will give a view of various historical topics behind the meaning of Thanksgiving and how it has affected Native Americans today, such as the traditions, sacrifice, heroism and unforgettable losses of loved ones and families. 

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Ingram Aschalon ‘24
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Uncensored History of Thanksgiving 

In the novel There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange gave a violent description of the history behind Thanksgiving. This project will give a view of various historical topics behind the meaning of Thanksgiving and how it has affected Native Americans today, such as the traditions, sacrifice, heroism and unforgettable losses of loved ones and families. 

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Harrison Ganong ‘26
MAJOR: ATHLETIC TRAINING

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG,
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY & COMMUNITY PLANNING & PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Creating Imageability and Inclusivity in Westfield 

Our semester-long Discover Westfield course drew the conclusion that Westfield struggles with building a community. Utilizing survey data and research to develop an idea, this presentation will display a plan to increase a sense of belonging by considering diverse artistic urban design interventions.  

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 Kiley Palmquist ‘26
MAJOR: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG,
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY & COMMUNITY PLANNING & PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Creating Imageability and Inclusivity in Westfield 

Our semester-long Discover Westfield course drew the conclusion that Westfield struggles with building a community. Utilizing survey data and research to develop an idea, this presentation will display a plan to increase a sense of belonging by considering diverse artistic urban design interventions.  

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Austin Sullivan ‘26
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY
FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG,
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY & COMMUNITY PLANNING & PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Creating Imageability and Inclusivity in Westfield 

Our semester-long Discover Westfield course drew the conclusion that Westfield struggles with building a community. Utilizing survey data and research to develop an idea, this presentation will display a plan to increase a sense of belonging by considering diverse artistic urban design interventions.  

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Gabriella Mortensen ‘26
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Powwow Regalia 

In the novel There, There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange references regalia, traditional clothing and items worn at Native American powwows. This project will research the meaning, origin, and purpose of regalia, who wears it and for which dances. 

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Emily Turner '25
MAJOR: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

The Importance of Inclusion in a K-12 Classroom 

This project is focused on a survey from teachers about how they include students from all different cultural backgrounds and their knowledge about racial discrimination. With this data from multiple teachers and outside research, I will be making a blog post featuring ways to include all students in the classroom environment.  
 

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Jazmaryann Brightly-Cruz ‘24
MAJOR: ART

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Powwows And The Meaning of Powwow Regalia 

In his novel There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange depicts a powwow and characters wear traditional powwow regalia.  This presentation will describe when and where powwows started as well as the cultural significance of the traditional regalia worn for powwow dances.  

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Emily Devlin ‘24
MAJOR: COMMUNICATIONS

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Girls and Women Gone Missing  

In the novel The Marrow Thieves, Métis author Cherie Dimaline portrays violence against women through the Indigenous female characters. This project will research the history and statistics of murdered and missing Indigenous women, and call for the need to bring more awareness to this topic and reduce the numbers.  

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Rose Pennucci ‘25 
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Girls and Women Gone Missing  

In the novel The Marrow Thieves, Métis author Cherie Dimaline portrays violence against women through the Indigenous female characters. This project will research the history and statistics of murdered and missing Indigenous women, and call for the need to bring more awareness to this topic and reduce the numbers.  

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Raya Mackechnie ‘26
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Girls and Women Gone Missing  

In the novel The Marrow Thieves, Métis author Cherie Dimaline portrays violence against women through the Indigenous female characters. This project will research the history and statistics of murdered and missing Indigenous women, and call for the need to bring more awareness to this topic and reduce the numbers.  

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LJ Claudio ‘25
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR WYATT PAIGE HERMANSEN, ENGLISH 

Poems: A Collection on Language 

My work is about the language spoken versus the language written. My collection contains themes of loss as well as the way language is viewed in society.  

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Aaron Stout ’24
MAJOR: MUSIC COMPOSITION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Spirituality over Artistry: Analyzing the Work of James Hampton in the Context of the  Novel There There 

In his novel There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange went out of his way to include the work of artist James Hampton. This project will analyze the work of Hampton and offer an analysis of why Orange chose to include a reference to this unique artist. 

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Summer O'Neil ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH & THEATRE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Heartbeat of Mother Nature 

In the novel, There There, by Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange, there are many examples of how drumming is used in Native American cultures to bring people together in drum circles and at powwows to connect one to their spiritual self. This project will research Native American music and the significance of it to one's spiritual self.  

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John Ware ‘26       
MAJOR: UNDECLARED

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

History of Crime in Oakland 

 In the novel There There, by Tommy Orange, a member of both the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of Oklahoma, he references crime within the youth of Oakland, California. This project will help to express the history of crime rates within Oakland and help viewers become more aware of how these activities affect society for Native American residents of Oakland today. 

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Brian Chalmers ‘24
MAJOR: MARKETING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

An Unbreakable Code: The Navajo Code Talkers

In his play, The Moon in Two Windows, Kiowa Author N. Scott Momaday depicts the first students at The Carlisle Indian Industrial School, the goal of which was to erase Native American language and culture in efforts of assimilation. A generation later, some of his Navajo students used their invaluable Native American Language to create an unbreakable code that ultimately won the Second World War.  

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Elizabeth Mercer ‘25
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Inspiring Native American Women Athletes 

In his play, The Moon in Two Windows, Kiowa author N.Scott Momaday, celebrates the accomplishments of Jim Thorpe who is an  Olympic Gold Medalist from the Sac and Fox Tribe;  however, no female athlete has been celebrated in this semester’s literature class. This CURCA presentation gives credit to Native American female athletes whose accomplishments in professional and Olympic sports deserve more recognition because they can inspire the future generation of athletes.  

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Meghan Devlin ’25
MAJOR: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

How Can Educators Destigmatize Special Education 

This project explores ideas to encourage future educators to destigmatize special education among all student populations.  

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Owen Browne ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Residential Schools and Intergenerational Trauma 

In class, we learned about the Residential Schools that Native American children were forced to attend. For our project we decided to explore and elaborate on the effects these schools, and the effects they have on Native American people today. 

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Sam Santos ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Residential Schools and Intergenerational Trauma 

In class, we learned about the Residential Schools that Native American children were forced to attend. For our project we decided to explore and elaborate on the effects these schools, and the effects they have on Native American people today. 

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Hannah Donofrio ‘25
MAJOR: MARKETING
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Powwow Traditions and Their Connection To Spirituality 

The novel There, There by Tommy Orange explores the spirituality between powwow traditions and their connection to the community. This poster will dive into these topics as well as how they connect to Native American clothing styles and different dance styles. 

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Kelsey McCarthy ‘25
MAJOR: NURSING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Powwow Traditions and Their Connection To Spirituality 

The novel There, There by Tommy Orange explores the spirituality between powwow traditions and their connection to the community. This poster will dive into these topics as well as how they connect to Native American clothing styles and different dance styles. 

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Gabriella Mortensen ‘26
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Powwow Regalia 

In the novel There, There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange references regalia, traditional clothing and items worn at Native American powwows. This project will research the meaning, origin, and purpose of regalia, who wears it and for which dances. 

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Joey Wlazlo ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Deep Dive into Dakota Ceremonies and Traditions 

In Standing Rock Sioux author Susan Power’s short story "First Fruits," Dakota student Georgiana arrives at Harvard University to begin her first year, and her father smokes out her dorm room with prayer tobacco in order to expel evil spirits. This project will research this use of prayer tobacco as well as other Dakota (Sioux) ceremonies and traditions to explain their meanings and components. 

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Molly Champney ‘25
MAJOR: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Malnourishments in Student Athletes 

How can we help prevent malnutrition in athletes? This project, a poster campaign, covers the dangers of undiagnosed malnourishment in athletes, and gives tips and tricks to stop it before it starts. 

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Amanda Murphy ‘25
MAJOR: UNDECLARED

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Using Social Media to Fight Social Media: Creating Awareness of Social Media Dangers

How is modern day social media affecting young people's minds and well being and how they view themselves?  This project, a series of Instagram posts, is meant to spread awareness of the dangers of social media, and how to navigate it.

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Brody Tapply ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Mental Health in the Criminal Justice System 

Both criminal offenders  and legal officers themselves deal with mental health issues on a daily basis. This project provides recognition of the issue, and different practices to work towards a better understanding. 

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Ethan Russell ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Gun Violence and Trauma in Modern America 

How can we fix the gun problem in America? In this project I go over how the gun problem in America causes not only death but mental trauma to those who are affected in school settings. 

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Drew Cirillo ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Health Equity in the Prison System, A Social Media Campaign 

As a community we need to fight for better health equity in the prison system, because prisoners are facing high risks like disease, drug addiction, and mental illness. This project, a social media campaign, seeks to educate the public about this issue. 

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Curtis Dion ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Bringing Awareness to Mental Health in the Military 

In 2020, over 582 military members died by suicide. This project, a newspaper article explores how that number could be decreased. 

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Lauryn Whynott ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Increasing Women in Law Enforcement

How can the law enforcement increase their diversity among women and minorities from the college level? By creating a poster campaign, women in the criminal justice major will support each other as they pursue a career in law enforcement.  

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Teyonce Nunnally-Bess ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Addiction Support 

Many people who deal with addiction think that they are alone and not worthy. This project, a poster campaign, will help them believe otherwise, and highlight available support systems.  

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Caitlyn Santos ‘25
MAJOR: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

How Much is Curriculum Impacting Students?  

This project dives deeper into the curriculum, and how much it can impact students as they grow up, and explores curricula that are less structured. This project will be an email to K-12 administrators and teachers about how they perceive the curriculum. 

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Patrick Hughes ‘25
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

mproving the Relationship Between Officers and the Community 

How can both the police and the community improve their relationship? This project is a letter to a local police department asking them to hold/create a workshop that will Improve the relationship between officers and the community.   

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Cameron Corcoran ‘25
MAJOR: POLITICAL SCIENCE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Advocacy for Student Wellbeing 

In a study that surveyed about 1000 high school students, in regards to lockdown/quarantine, 30% had considered suicide, and 10% actually tried committing. In this project, a letter, I'm advocating to education and government officials to further investigate how to help students who've taken hits to their physical, mental, and educational health due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.  

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Crystal Rucki ‘24
MAJOR: ENGLISH & COMMUNICATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Breaking the Stigma Around Academic Help-Seeking

This project, a panel discussion proposal, seeks to increase student awareness on the stigma surrounding academic help seeking and methods both students and educators can utilize in order to encourage help-seeking behaviors.  

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Kaitlyn Egan  ‘24
MAJOR: ENGLISH & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and their Portrayal in Native American Literature

In both novels There There by Tommy Orange (Cheyenne and Arapaho), and The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline (Métis), female characters are continuously subject to violence. This presentation will compare these character depictions to the existing crime data, and highlight the movement toward visibility of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in our society today.  

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John Henneberger ‘26
MAJOR: EXPLORATORY 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Intergenerational Trauma Among Native Americans. 

In the novel There There, author Tommy Orange, a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, references the horrifying effects of intergenerational trauma though different character perspectives, such as Jacquie Red Feather. This project will draw on research to explore the psychological, and sociological effects of intergenerational trauma among Native Americans, as well as treatment strategies.  

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Brynn Friedhaber ‘23
MAJOR: BUSINESS MARKETING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Underrepresented Native American History Behind Harvard University 

In the short story “First Fruits,” Standing Rock Sioux Tribe member Susan Power explores the overlooked Native American history of Harvard University, which included the Indian College established in the 1640's. This project will research the Harvard Indian College, the first Native American graduate, what Harvard is doing today to represent this history, and how Harvard’s Native American students and faculty are feeling today regarding their representation.

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Courtney Berthiaume ‘26
MAJOR: MARKETING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Lasting Effects of Native American Boarding Schools  

Kiowa author N. Scott Momaday writes about the history and experience of the Native American boarding schools in his screenplay, The Moon in Two Windows, set at Carlisle Indian Industrial School, the very first of this type. This presentation will discuss not only the students' experiences in the schools, but also what happened to the ones who survived, how this history is taught in modern day classrooms, and the overall lasting legacy of the boarding schools today. 

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Seamus Mitchell ‘24
MAJOR: ENGLISH & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

A Deeper Consideration of There There by Tommy Orange

After reading 3 different critic reviews of the book, There There by Tommy Orange, each critic has formulated their thoughts and ideas to attest that Orange’s book is an incredible work of art and should be read in classrooms worldwide. In addition, each critic voiced their concerns about the violence and stereotypical views readers can create by reading some of the content in the books. The critics believe stereotypes about Native American crime on other Native American people can lead to the readers thinking all Native Americans are violent killers and many other terrible ideas that are not true.  

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Cheyenne Courtney  ‘25
MAJOR: MARKETING
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Indigenous Mascots: The Impact on Self-Identity    

In the novel, There, There by Cheyenne and Arapaho author, Tommy Orange references the idea of Native images issued in professional sports and hints at the hurt and blatant disregard of their culture in the stereotypical representations. This project will research the impacts of harmful and inaccurate depictions of Indigenous people in the sporting industry and how it impacts their self-identity.   

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Lucia Sanches ‘25
MAJOR: MARKETING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Indigenous Mascots: The Impact on Self-Identity    

In the novel, There, There by Cheyenne and Arapaho author, Tommy Orange references the idea of Native images issued in professional sports and hints at the hurt and blatant disregard of their culture in the stereotypical representations. This project will research the impacts of harmful and inaccurate depictions of Indigenous people in the sporting industry and how it impacts their self-identity.   

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Madison White ‘26
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Breaking the Silence; Bringing an End to Violence Against Indigenous Women.  

In the contemporary novels Marrow Thieves written by a Canadian author from the Métis tribe Cherie Dimaline and There There written by an american author from the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes Tommy Orange, violence against Indigenous Women is depicted. The poster presentation will illustrate the high rates  of violence towards Canadian and American Indigenous Women, educate the audience on the problem, and highlight the activists who are raising awareness and their proposed solutions.  

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Samantha Hallice ‘24
MAJOR: BUSINESS MANGEMENT

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 

In the novel, There There, author Tommy Orange of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes depicts the war on Indigenous women who experience higher rates of violence than any other racial or ethnic group in America. This project will research why the rates of missing and murdered Native women are so high, why Indigenous women are being targeted, what is being done to bring awareness, and how to end violence against Indigenous women.  

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Hannah LeBlanc ’26
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Activists and Nonprofit Groups using Social Media  

Social media is a crucial part of Native American Activists and Nonprofit groups’ journey. Through social media these groups are able to spread awareness, gain traction, and receive support. 

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Connor Fitzgerald ‘26
MAJOR: EXPLORATORY 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Native American Hunting Techniques & Traditions  

In the futuristic novel The Marrow Thieves (2017) by Metis author Cherie Dimaline, the author describes many hunting scenes in which the characters draw on traditional Indigenous hunting practices. This project will focus on some of the many Indigenous hunting traditions in North America, as well as what has remained the same and what modern hunters have taken from Native Americans to continue the tradition and passion.  

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Emma Bowes ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH SECONDARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Truth behind Indigenous History in our Curriculum 

In the novel There There by Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes author Tommy Orange gives the background of Indigenous culture and history. This project will research propaganda's effect on Indigenous history in schools and today's society.  

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Aidan Robert ‘26
MAJOR: BIOLOGY EDUCATION
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Truth behind Indigenous History in our Curriculum 

In the novel There There by Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes author Tommy Orange gives the background of Indigenous culture and history. This project will research propaganda's effect on Indigenous history in schools and today's society.  

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Bryce York ‘26
MAJOR: HISTORY EDUCATION
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Truth behind Indigenous History in our Curriculum 

In the novel There There by Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes author Tommy Orange gives the background of Indigenous culture and history. This project will research propaganda's effect on Indigenous history in schools and today's society.  

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Sean Macinnis ‘24
MAJOR: COMMUNICATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Drumming in Native American Culture  

In the novel There There, Author Tommy Orange talks about native American powwow's and what they mean to the culture. We found out in the book that a huge part of powwows and the culture are the drums especially with Thomas frank . This project will research how drums affect their culture. 

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Tatiana Reyes ‘26
MAJOR: HEALTH SCIENCE 

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG,
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

Westfield: The Conversion of Downtown into an Uptown 🥳 

In a semester-long course focusing on downtown Westfield, we learned through a survey that residents inside the town desire to see more connection and involvement. With a few tweaks, including plazas, interactive structures, and art pieces, the underused Westfield Park Square and River Front can be transformed back into spaces where people can socialize and interact with one another.  

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Olivia Stafford ‘26
MAJOR: MATHEMATICS
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG,
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

Westfield: The Conversion of Downtown into an Uptown 🥳 

In a semester-long course focusing on downtown Westfield, we learned through a survey that residents inside the town desire to see more connection and involvement. With a few tweaks, including plazas, interactive structures, and art pieces, the underused Westfield Park Square and River Front can be transformed back into spaces where people can socialize and interact with one another.  

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Brighid Deveau ‘26
MAJOR: UNDECLARED
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG,
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

Westfield: The Conversion of Downtown into an Uptown 🥳 

In a semester-long course focusing on downtown Westfield, we learned through a survey that residents inside the town desire to see more connection and involvement. With a few tweaks, including plazas, interactive structures, and art pieces, the underused Westfield Park Square and River Front can be transformed back into spaces where people can socialize and interact with one another.  

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Angela Hayes ‘26
MAJOR: MATHEMATICS

PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG, GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

What Better Place To Chill Than Westfield! 

A few open public spaces in the downtown have the potential for a makeover to make Westfield a place to gather and hang out. Our research-based urban design recommendations aim at creating places to chill in Westfield, such as outdoor dining, seating areas, and shaded areas that attract all age demographics, which would help bring vitality back into Westfield.  

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Melody Latshaw ‘26
MAJOR: UNDECLARED
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG, 
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

What Better Place To Chill Than Westfield! 

A few open public spaces in the downtown have the potential for a makeover to make Westfield a place to gather and hang out. Our research-based urban design recommendations aim at creating places to chill in Westfield, such as outdoor dining, seating areas, and shaded areas that attract all age demographics, which would help bring vitality back into Westfield.  

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Tyler Sullivan ‘26
MAJOR: UNDECLARED
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG, 
GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

What Better Place To Chill Than Westfield! 

A few open public spaces in the downtown have the potential for a makeover to make Westfield a place to gather and hang out. Our research-based urban design recommendations aim at creating places to chill in Westfield, such as outdoor dining, seating areas, and shaded areas that attract all age demographics, which would help bring vitality back into Westfield.  

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Isabella Piacente ‘26
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY

PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG, GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

Discovering Westfield Through Arts and Signage 

Survey data show that Westfield residents believe that downtown Westfield is currently very confusing, dull, and lacks a common theme, but, with the help of artistic signage, Westfield can become a place that is not only inviting, but easy to navigate for people of many different backgrounds. Cultivating from survey data, site analysis, research, and personal experience, this presentation will represent a solution and vision for a more inclusive, vibrant, inviting, and interactive environment in downtown Westfield. 

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Gabriella Zive ‘26
MAJOR: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG, GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

Discovering Westfield Through Arts and Signage 

Survey data show that Westfield residents believe that downtown Westfield is currently very confusing, dull, and lacks a common theme, but, with the help of artistic signage, Westfield can become a place that is not only inviting, but easy to navigate for people of many different backgrounds. Cultivating from survey data, site analysis, research, and personal experience, this presentation will represent a solution and vision for a more inclusive, vibrant, inviting, and interactive environment in downtown Westfield. 

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Meghan Haupt ’26
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH & PROFESSOR DRISTI NEOG, GEOGRAPHY PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY

Discovering Westfield Through Arts and Signage 

Survey data show that Westfield residents believe that downtown Westfield is currently very confusing, dull, and lacks a common theme, but, with the help of artistic signage, Westfield can become a place that is not only inviting, but easy to navigate for people of many different backgrounds. Cultivating from survey data, site analysis, research, and personal experience, this presentation will represent a solution and vision for a more inclusive, vibrant, inviting, and interactive environment in downtown Westfield. 

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Christopher North ‘23
MAJOR: REGIONAL PLANNING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH

Classroom Despair: Examining The Use of Funding (And Lack of Funding) in  

Baltimore’s Current Education System 

For decades, Baltimore’s public school district has been underfunded and this has impacted students’ accessibility to vital services and opportunities to pursue further education. An analysis on statistics such as race, test scores, and graduation rates would help address institutional problems with Baltimore’s education system and inspire potential ideas for improving the experience for students in the classroom, as well as an evaluation on what the state government should do to allocate their funds to help ensure student success in and outside school. 

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Jessica Zaniewski ‘25
MAJOR: ENGLISH & SECONDARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAMS, ENGLISH

Confidence in the Classroom: Building Meaningful Student-Teacher Relationships  

My project addresses the importance of building meaningful student-teacher relationships, in a K-12 environment, that are built on trust and acceptance. I have created a bulletin board depicting the importance of building these relationships and how both students and teachers can work together to create a more positive learning environment. 

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Jenna Higley ‘23
MAJOR: MOVEMENT SCIENCE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Debates Around Native American Blood Quantum  

In his novel, There There, Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange references the topic of blood quantum, a measurement of how “Indian” an individual is. This poster will present information about what blood quantum is, different qualifications that various tribes require, and how it contributes to diminishing legal recognition of Native American identity or “paper genocide.”  

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Kyle Cole ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLSIH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

An Examination of Dakota Mythology 

Yankton Dakota writer Zitkala-Sa's "Schooldays of an Indian Girl" and Standing Rock Dakota author Susan Power's "First Fruits" both include many references to Dakota (or Sioux) mythology, beliefs, and customs. This project will take a look into some of the stories, themes, and ideas behind Sioux mythology and discover what sort of significance they hold. 

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Jason Brewster ‘25
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Addressing Appropriation: Allyship Through Open-Minded Cultural Celebration 

In the short story “First Fruits” by Standing Rock Sioux author Susan Power, a white college student’s open-mindedness to actively exchange and participate with her Sioux roommate's Native culture is depicted as a healing and non-offensive practice. My project seeks to determine the difference between cultural appropriation and celebration to provide a lens for non-Indigenous people to become better educated and more effective allies. 

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Bryan Grady ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

The Dakota 38 

In the poem 38, Oglala Lakota author Layli Long Soldier gives a history of the executions of thirty-eight Dakota men by the United States government. This project will delve further into the details of these executions and will answer questions regarding the events that occurred leading up to them and afterwards. 

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Ruby Recio ‘25
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Gender Diversity in Criminal Justice 

What are the impacts of having a more gender diverse criminal justice workforce? This project, a news letter article, will explore the need for greater gender diversity.  

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Madison Dudley ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Purpose of the Native American Powwow and Regalia 

In the novel There There, Cheyenne author Tommy Orange brings his characters together through a powwow and illustrates the significance of the powwow regalia to the Native American community. This project will research the impact and meaning of what both the powwow and regalia represent to Native Americans. 

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Elier Rosado ‘26
MAJOR: HISTORY

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Purpose of the Native American Powwow and Regalia 

In the novel There There, Cheyenne author Tommy Orange brings his characters together through a powwow and illustrates the significance of the powwow regalia to the Native American community. This project will research the impact and meaning of what both the powwow and regalia represent to Native Americans. 

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Caroline Eckert ‘25
MAJOR: HEALTH SCIENCE

PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Substance Abuse in "Urban Indian" Communities 

In the novel There There, author Tommy Orange, of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, emphasizes the topic of substance abuse throughout the stories of his 12 Native American characters who live in Oakland, CA, making them part of the "Urban Indian" population.  This project will research the prevalence of substance abuse and addiction among Native Americans and in particular its impact on the "Urban Indian" population. 

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Lauren Legere ‘23
MAJOR: ALTHLETIC TRAINING
EDUCATION
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA

Substance Abuse in "Urban Indian" Communities 

In the novel There There, author Tommy Orange, of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, emphasizes the topic of substance abuse throughout the stories of his 12 Native American characters who live in Oakland, CA, making them part of the "Urban Indian" population.  This project will research the prevalence of substance abuse and addiction among Native Americans and in particular its impact on the "Urban Indian" population. 

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Skylar Allard ‘24
MAJOR: PSYCHOLOGY
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Substance Abuse in "Urban Indian" Communities 

In the novel There There, author Tommy Orange, of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, emphasizes the topic of substance abuse throughout the stories of his 12 Native American characters who live in Oakland, CA, making them part of the "Urban Indian" population.  This project will research the prevalence of substance abuse and addiction among Native Americans and in particular its impact on the "Urban Indian" population. 

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Allison VanSleet ‘24
MAJOR: NURSING
PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA

Substance Abuse in "Urban Indian" Communities 

In the novel There There, author Tommy Orange, of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, emphasizes the topic of substance abuse throughout the stories of his 12 Native American characters who live in Oakland, CA, making them part of the "Urban Indian" population.  This project will research the prevalence of substance abuse and addiction among Native Americans and in particular its impact on the "Urban Indian" population. 

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Cameron Ranck ‘26
MAJOR: ATHLETIC TRAINING

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Global Warming and Indegenious Tribes  

In the novel, The Marrow Thieves, by Cherie Dimaline, many present day issue can be found throughout the themes of the book. This project will address the topic of global warming and how effects the day to day lives of Native American and Indigenous tribes.

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Afia Aning ‘25
MAJOR: HEALTH SCIENCES
SECONDARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Thanksgiving Holiday Or Horror 

In There There, Tommy Orange from the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes in Oklahoma. In his book he reveals the true meaning behind thanksgiving. This Project will uncover the sickening, historical horrors of this so called celebratory holiday! 

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 Nayelie Velez ‘24
MAJOR: BUSINESS MANGEMENT
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Thanksgiving Holiday Or Horror 

In There There, Tommy Orange from the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes in Oklahoma. In his book he reveals the true meaning behind thanksgiving. This Project will uncover the sickening, historical horrors of this so called celebratory holiday! 

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Janel Echevarria ‘26
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

Thanksgiving Holiday Or Horror 

In There There, Tommy Orange from the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes in Oklahoma. In his book he reveals the true meaning behind thanksgiving. This Project will uncover the sickening, historical horrors of this so called celebratory holiday! 

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Anna Brewer ‘26
MAJOR: ENGLISH
SECONDARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

A Closer Look at Native American Medicine  

In numerous examples of contemporary Native American Literature, authors depict Indigenous medicines and ritual treatments. This project will show research that explains some of these methods and practices that are used to heal.   

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Derya Karakus ‘24
MAJOR: SECONDARY EDUCATION
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

A Closer Look at Native American Medicine  

In numerous examples of contemporary Native American Literature, authors depict Indigenous medicines and ritual treatments. This project will show research that explains some of these methods and practices that are used to heal.   

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Andrew Chadbourne ‘24
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE
FACULTY SPONSOR: PROFESSOR VANESSA DIANA, ENGLISH

A Closer Look at Native American Medicine  

In numerous examples of contemporary Native American Literature, authors depict Indigenous medicines and ritual treatments. This project will show research that explains some of these methods and practices that are used to heal.   

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Abigail Krug ‘25
MAJOR: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR BEVERLY ARMY WILLIAM, ENGLISH

Inclusion in the Classroom 

Inclusion in the classroom is such an important aspect of teaching. Students who struggle in school because of intellectual and physical disabilities should be able to feel as important and able as every other student in their class. 

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Carly Hayes ‘24
MAJOR: MATHEMATICS & SECONDARY EDUCATION

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH  AND PROFESSOR JAMES SCHLAFFER, ECONOMICS

Opportunity Disparity: Education in The Wire 

I will be looking at the education system in The Wire to see the effects on education and graduation rates due to the lack of opportunities and resources available to students. I want to compare the education structure in Baltimore to another city that has a completely different support structure to identify the reasons for the differing graduation rates. 

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Levi Ekstrom  ‘23
MAJOR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE & ETHNIC & GENEDER STUDIES

FACULTY SPONSORS: PROFESSOR LEAH NIELSEN, ENGLISH

Violence Towards LGBT Bodies and Characters 

Often in television LGBT identifying characters are brutalized in story lines. This trope is evident in the influential TV series The Wire, where characters are brutally tortured, murdered, and dehumanized.  

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